Special Report

A Penchant for Violence

Martin Luther King phrased the problem beautifully: “Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.” Although humanity’s historical record hints at a great capacity for love, we’ve left a bloody trail that belies our best intentions. Will we ever outgrow our penchant for violence?

Healing the Violent Heart

David Hulme

Regardless of the ideals set forth by leaders, humanity has never yet succeeded in preventing violence and war. Is there any solution?

God and Violence

God and Violence

David Hulme

If God is both loving and all-powerful, why doesn’t He prevent evil in the world? Is there a way to understand God’s relationship to violence?

Violence: Is Religion the Problem?

Ron Dodgen

Vision reviews three books addressing the increasingly insistent claim that without religion, there would be much less war and violence in the world.

 

Family Violence

Family Violence

Gina Stepp

What causes families to self-destruct, and how can the greater community help couples solve relationship problems and perhaps even prevent family violence?

Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence

Who Am I? The Question of Youth Violence

Gina Stepp

Research suggests that a child who lacks a positive sense of identity is much more likely to turn violent. Gina Stepp explores five keys to help prevent youth violence. 

When Terror Reigns

Gina Stepp

Terrorism is nothing new. Yet a meaningful definition remains elusive, understanding the issues is a challenge, and a lasting solution seems more than we can hope for. Are there answers?

The Making of a Terrorist

The Making of a Terrorist

Gina Stepp

Psychologists and policymakers alike are trying to understand what makes a terrorist. How does one stop the assembly line?

Of War and Peace

Of War and Peace

Martin Coates

Today, as the world marks the 100-year anniversary of the conflict’s fateful beginning, World War I continues to be fertile ground for authors. Vision reviews three new books on the subject.

The Theater of War

The Theater of War

Daniel Tompsett

Since at least the time of Homer and his epic account of the Trojan War, people have glorified warfare and reveled in it as entertainment.

A War to End All War

A War to End All War

Edwin Stepp

H.G. Wells is remembered primarily for his science-fiction works, but he also coined a phrase that for a century has been linked with World War I. As the world marks the centennial of that war’s fateful beginning, we ask: Can a war end all war?

War to End All War? Why It Didn't

The War to End All War: Why It Didn't

Gavin Barclay

World War I has been described as the war to end all war. The ensuing years—most notably, the Second World War—showed that this thought was ridiculously naïve.

Interview with Sir John Keegan: The New War

The New War?

David Hulme

David Hulme spoke with military historian Sir John Keegan soon after 9/11. Vision revisits their discussion on the changing face of war.

Child Soldiers

Child Soldiers

Michelle Steel

The majority of wars today are intrastate conflicts fought with small arms, and where such conflicts take place, many of those fighting are children.

Our Appetite for Aggression

Our Appetite for Aggression

Edwin Stepp

Some say that media violence isn’t a major cause of aggression in children, but can constant bombardment with violent images be helping them develop optimally?